A Cup of Joe

August 16th, 2012  |  The Blog

Not only does your morning cup of coffee help wake you up and start the day, it also offers some health benefits, specifically lowering the risk of developing dementia.

A recent study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, indicates that patients with mild cognitive impairment might avoid developing dementia by consuming several cups of coffee a day.

The Study

The results of the aforementioned study, conducted on mice that were regularly given caffeinated coffee, showed that they did not progress to developing dementia. When applied to humans with mild cognitive impairment, those with a lower than suggested caffeine blood level did progress to dementia.

This study was taken a step further and looked at the human protein called amyloid-beta, which is produced in the brain. It was found in mice, as well, and is positively impacted and protected by coffee intake. Amyloid-beta prevents cognitive decline.

How Much Coffee is Enough?

The average American consumes 1-2 cups of coffee a day, which delivers 100-200 mg of caffeine. This is not a sufficient caffeine intake to offer protection to the patient from developing dementia. The suggested plasma level of caffeine is 1200 ng/mL. This level necessitates drinking 3-5 cups of coffee a day. Five cups of coffee delivers 500 mg of caffeine.

The psychostimulant effect of coffee has been proven to have a positive affect on the cognitive function of women.

Coffee also contains antioxidants and anti-inflammatory components, which are thought to enhance to Alzheimer’s disease protection.

Lifestyle Factors Influencing Alzheimer’s Disease

There are other factors, in addition to your morning cups of Joe that can impact your risk of developing dementia. They include:

  • Physical activity and exercise
  • Cognitive stimulation
  • Being diagnosed with hypertension
  • Sufficient antioxidant intake, including fresh fruits and vegetables

So, what’s the verdict? Caffeinated coffee does reduce a person’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease so savor your morning cup of Joe.

 

 

 

 

nburgess
About nburgess

Add Your Comments

Subscribe

Subscribe to the NJO blogClick here for a free subscription to the NJO blog. Don't miss a column!

Weekly Columns

Writers

Recent Posts


 
Copyright © 1999-2014 Nursing Jobs, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
Call 888.613.8844 (M-F, 7-5 Pacific)

Send a message